Things I wish I’d noticed in grad school

Back in the day, I tended to get a little hyper-focussed on things. I’m sure someone, sometime, somewhere pointed this stuff out to me. But at the time it went over my head and I learned these things the hard way. Maybe my list of things I wish I’d noticed helps someone else.

  • Your professional contacts matter and it’s OK to ask for help. You’re not researching in a vacuum, the people around you want to help.
  • You need to look outside your department and university. There’s a bigger, wider world out there and while what’s going on inside your little world seems like it’s important: you need to be aware of what’s outside too.
  • Being methodologically/theoretically robust matters, yes. But learning when to let it go is going to be harder than learning the theory/methodology. No easy answers here, all you can do is make your decision and own it.
  • It doesn’t matter how much you read, you’re not going to be an expert across your whole field. Just be aware of the field and be an expert in what you’re doing right now. That’s OK.
  • Get a life. Really.

Cheat Sheets: The New Programmer’s Friend

Cheat sheets are brilliant: whether you’re learning to program for the first time or you’re picking up a new language. Most data scientists are probably programming regularly in multiple languages at any given time: cheat sheets are a handy reference guide that saves you from googling how to “do that thing you know I did it in python yesterday but how does it go in stata?”

This post is an ongoing curation of cheat sheets in the languages I use. In other words, it’s a cheat sheet for cheat sheets. Because a blog post is more efficient than googling “that cheatsheet, with the orange bit and the boxes.” You can find my list of the tutorials and how-to guides I enjoyed here.

R cheat sheets + tutorials

Python cheat sheets

Stata cheat sheets

  • There is a whole list of them here, organised by category.
  • Stata cheat sheet, I could have used this five years ago. Also very useful when it’s been awhile since you last played in the stata sandpit.
  • This isn’t a cheat sheet, but it’s an exhaustive list of commands that makes it easy to find what you want to do- as long as you already have a good idea.

SPSS cheat sheets

  • “For Dummies” has one for SPSS too.
  • This isn’t so much a cheat sheet but a very basic click-by-click guide to trying out SPSS for the first time. If you’re new to this, it’s a good start. Since SPSS is often the gateway program for many people, it’s a useful resource.

General cheat sheets + discusions

  • Comparisons between R, Stata, SPSS, SAS.
  • This post from KD Nuggets has lots of cheat sheets for R, Python, SQL and a bunch of others.

I’ll add to this list as I find things.