Q&A vs the Leaders’ Debate: is everyone singing from the same song sheet?

The election campaign is in full swing here in Australia and earlier this week the leaders of the two main parties, Malcolm Turnbull and Bill Shorten, faced off in a heavily scripted debate in which few questions were answered and the talking points were well practiced. An encounter described as “diabolical” and “boring“, fewer Australians tuned in compared to recent years. Possibly this was because they expected to hear what they had already heard before.

Since the song sheet was well rehearsed, this seemed like the perfect opportunity for another auspol word cloud. The transcript of the debate was made available on Malcolm Turnbull’s website and it was an easy enough matter of poking around and seeing what could be found. Chris Ullmann, who moderator, was added to the stop words list as he was a prominent feature in earlier versions of the cloud.

debate word cloud

The song sheet was mild: the future tense “will” was in the middle with Shorten, labor, plan, people and Turnbull. Also featured were tax, economic, growth, change and other economic nouns like billion, (per)cent, economy, budget, superannuation. There was mention of climate, (people) smugglers, fair and action, but these were relatively isolated as topics.

In summary, this word cloud is not that different to that generated from the carefully strategised twitter feeds of Turnbull and Shorten I looked at last week.

The ABC’s program Q and A could be a better opportunity for politicians to depart from the song sheet and offer less scripted insight: why not see what the word cloud throws up?

This week’s program aired the day after the leader’s debate and featured Steve Ciobo (Liberal: minister for trade), Terri Butler (Labor: shadow parliamentary secretary for child safety and prevention of family violence), Richard di Natale (Greens, leader, his twitter word cloud is here), Nick Xenophon (independent senator) and Jacqui Lambie (independent senator).  Tony Jones hosted the program and suffered the same fate as Chris Uhlmann.

QandA word cloud

The word cloud picked up on the discursive format of the show: names of panellists feature prominently. Interestingly, Richard di Natale appears in the centre. Also prominent are election related words such as Australia, government, country, question, debate.

Looking at other topics thrown up by the word cloud, there is a broad range: penalty rates, coal, senate, economy, businesses, greens, policy, money, Queensland, medicare, politician, commission.

Two different formats, two different panels and two different sets of topics. Personally, I prefer it when the song sheet has a few more pages.

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