Expertise vs Awareness for the Data Scientist

We’ve all seen them: articles with headlines like “17 things you MUST know to be a data scientist” and “Great data scientists know these 198 algorithms no one else does.” While the content can be a useful read, the titles are clickbait and imposter syndrome is a common outcome.

You can’t be an expert in every skill on the crazy data science Venn Diagram. It’s not physically possible and if you try you’ll spend all your time attempting to become a “real” data scientist with no time left to be one. In any case, most of those diagrams actually describe an entire industry or a large and diverse team: not the individual.

Data scientists need expertise, but you only need expertise in the areas you’re working with right now. For the rest, you need awareness.

Awareness of the broad church that is data science tells you when you need more knowledge, more skill or more information than you currently have. Awareness of areas outside your expertise means you don’t default to the familiar, you make your decisions based on a broad understanding of what’s possible.

Expertise still matters, but the exact area you’re expert in is less important. Expertise gives you the skills you need to go out and learn new things when and as you need them. Expertise in Python gives you the skills to pick up R or C++ next time you need them. Expertise in econometrics gives you the skills to pick up machine learning. Heck, expertise in languages (human ones, not computer ones) is also a useful skill set for data scientists, in my view.

You need expertise because that gives you the core skills to pick up new things. You need awareness because that will let you know when you need the new things and what they could be. They’re not the same thing: so keep doing what you do well and keep one eye on what other people do well.

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