Data Visualisation: Hex Codes, Pantone Colours and Accessibility

One of the things I find hardest about data visualisation is colouring. I’m not a natural artist, much preferring everything in gentle shades of monochrome. Possibly beige. Obviously for any kind of data visualisation, this limited .Quite frankly this is the kind of comfort zone that needs setting on fire.

I’ve found this site really helpful: it’s a listing of the Pantone colours with both Hex and RGB codes for inserting straight into your visualisations. It’s a really useful correspondence if I’m working with someone (they can give me the Pantone colour numbers of their website or report palette- I just search the page).

One thing I’ve found, however, is that a surprising (to me) number of people have some kind of colour-based visual impairment. A palette that looks great to me may be largely meaningless to someone I’m working with. I found this out in one of those forehead slapping moments when I couldn’t understand why a team member wasn’t seeing the implications of my charts. That’s because, to him, those charts were worse than useless. They were a complete waste of his time.

Some resources I’ve found helpful in making my visualisations more accessible are the colourblind-friendly palettes discussed here and this discussion on R-Bloggers. The latter made me realise that up until now I’ve been building visualisations that were obscuring vital information for many users.

The things I think are important for building an accessible visualisation are:

  • Yes, compared to more subtle palettes, colour-blind friendly palettes look like particularly lurid unicorn vomit. They don’t have to look bad if you’re careful about combinations, but I’m of the opinion that prioritising accessibility for my users is more important than “pretty”.
  • Redundant encoding (discussed in the R-bloggers link above) is a great way ensuring users can make out the information you’re trying to get across. To make sure this is apparent in your scale, use a combination of scale_colour_manual() and scale_linetype_manual(). The latter works the same as scale_colour_manual() but is not as well covered in the literature.
  • Consider reducing the information you’re putting into each chart, or using a combination of facets and multiple panels. The less there is to differentiate, the easier it can be on your users. This is a good general point and not limited to those with colourblindness.

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