Political Donations 2015/16

Yesterday, the ABC released a dataset detailing donations made to political parties in Australia during the 2015-16 period. You can find their analysis and the data here. The data itself isn’t a particularly good representation of what was happening during the period: there isn’t a single donation to the One Nation Party among the lot of them, for example. This data isn’t a complete picture of what’s going on.

While the ABC made a pretty valiant effort to categorise where the donations were coming from, “uncategorised” was the last resort for many of the donors.

Who gets the money?

In total, there were 49 unique groups who received the money. Many of these were state branches of national parties, for example the Liberal Party of Australia – ACT Division, Liberal Party of Australia (S.A. Division) and so on. I’ve grouped these and others like it together under their national party. Other groups included small narrowly-focussed parties like the Shooters, Fishers and Farmers Party and the Australian Sex Party. Small micro parties like the Jacqui Lambie Network, Katter’s Australian Party and so on were grouped together. Parties with a conservative focus (Australian Christians, Family First, Democratic Labor Party) were grouped and those with a progressive focus (Australian Equality Party, Socialist Alliance) were also grouped together. Parties focused on immigration were combined.

The following chart shows the value of the donation declared and the recipient group that received it.

Scatter plot

Only one individual donation exceeded $500 000 and that was to the Liberal Party. It’s obscuring the rest of the distribution, so I’ve removed it in the next chart. Both the major parties receive more donations than the other parties, which comes as no surprise to anyone. However, the Greens have a proportion of very generous givers ($100 000+) which is quite substantial. The interesting question is not so much as who received it, but who gave the money.

Scatter plot with outlier removed

 

Who gave the money?

This is probably the more interesting point. The following charts use the ABC’s categories to see if we can break down where the (declared) money trail lies (for donations $500 000 and under). Again, the data confirmed what everyone already knew: unions give to the Labor party. Finance and insurance gave heavily to the Liberal Party (among others). Several clusters stand out, though: uncategorised donors give substantially to minor parties and the Greens have two major clusters of donors: individuals and a smaller one in the agriculture category.

Donor categories and value scatter plot

Breaking this down further, if we just look at where the money came from and who it went to, we can see that the immigration-focused parties are powered almost entirely by individual donations with some from uncategorised donors. Minor parties are powered by family trusts, unions and uncategorised donors. Greens by individuals, uncategorised and agriculture with some input from unions. What’s particularly interesting is the differences in Labor and Liberal donors. Compared to Liberal, Labor does not have donors in the tobacco industry, but also has less input by number of donations in agriculture, alcohol, advocacy/lobby groups, sports and water management. They also have fewer donations from uncategorised donors and more from unions.

Donors and Recipients Scatterplot

What did we learn?

Some of what we learned here was common knowledge: Labor doesn’t take donations from tobacco, but it does from unions. The unions don’t donate to Liberal, but advocacy and lobby groups do. The more interesting observations are focussed on the smaller parties: the cluster of agricultural donations for the Greens Party – normally LNP heartland; and the individual donations powering the parties focussed on immigration. The latter may have something to say for the money powering the far right.

 

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